Blu-Ray Review: Funeral Parade of Roses

Director: Toshio Matsumoto

Writer: Toshio Matsumoto

Cast: Pîtâ, Osamu Ogasawara, Yoshio Tsuchiya

Producers: Sumiko Fujisawa, Mitsuru Kudo, Keiko Machida

Music: Jôji Yuasa

Cinematography: Tatsuo Suzuki

Editor: Toshie Iwasa

Cert: 18

Running time: 105mins

Year: 1969


FILM: medium_5
EXTRAS:


Funeral Parade of Roses is released as part of the BFI Japan 2020 season, now on BFI Player

Click here for Japan 2020


What’s the story: In Tokyo, 1969, transsexual Eddie (Pîtâ) attempts to forget the traumatic events of her past.

What’s the verdict: Always referred to as the film Kubrick cited as an influence on A Clockwork Orange, Funeral Parade of Roses dazzles over 50 years since first release.

A stunning tapestry film, it is pitched so...

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Japan 2020’s Akira Kurosawa Collection – 5 Must-See Movies


For more information on BFI Japan 2020, click here

To view Japan 2020 on BFI Player, click here


BFI Player’s Japan 2020 season is now live, with two first rate collections to keep you occupied during lockdown. One focusses on Japan’s most famous filmmaker, Akira Kurosawa, and features 21 films from the 30 he made in a career spanning six decades. The other showcases classics of Japanese cinema across the decades – click here for details on that one.

People most likely know the name, but as the years tick by the audience for Kurosawa’s films inevitably dwindles. Which makes Japan 2020’s collection essential… for many reasons.

Chiefly, Kurosawa movies are dazzling. As important, they still seem fresh and accessible to modern eyes.

Kurosawa was the first ...

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BFI Player launches Japan 2020 in May



Japan 2020, a six month event showcasing over 100 years of Japanese cinema, is live now on BFI Player.

Collections on Akira Kurosawa and classic Japanese movies are available to watch, with more to follow in June through October.

The Tokyo Olympics are postponed until 2021, and possibly beyond. The chances of travelling to and from the Isle of Wight let alone Japan this year are wobbly. So, the fact the BFI are going ahead with the season is great news in a miserable time.

Safely escape lockdown for £4.99 a month (and two weeks free trial) by journeying through over one hundred years of Japanese cinema from the comfort of your living room.

Classics of Japan’s Golden Age and films that rocked the studio system...

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Extraction & Gangs of London – The Movie Robcast

The Movie Robcast reaches its 90th episode! And we’re marking the occasion with bang, looking at Chris Hemsworth’s explosive actioner Extraction and Gareth Evan’s brutal crime epic Gangs of London.

The Robs find a particularly familiar whiff to Extraction. But, they take the opportunity to invoke the oeuvre of straight-to-rental favourite Scott Adkins when discussing how closely Chris Hemsworth’s movie sticks to action movie beats. They also take time to ponder the business savvy of titling a film “Avengement” as Adkins did. Tune in for why it makes more sense than you’d think.

Then onto Gangs of London. Rob D binged the whole series, while Rob W only had time to watch the first episode, so the discussion is spoiler free...

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Saigon Metalhood – Inside Vietnamese Heavy Metal

If you want to rock down while you lockdown, we recommend a heavy dose of Saigon Metalhood. A documentary about the Vietnamese heavy metal scene since the 1970s, it uncovers a musical movement little known outside the country and one that receives little love from within.

Divided into three sections, Saigon Metalhood takes a past, present and future view of the country’s metal scene and key players.

We meet Trung Thanh Sago, who has flown the metal flag since the 1970s when the country was at war, and still fronts his band Sagometal. Trung Loki is another pioneer, again pushing a music genre largely unloved by a population who favour the synth stylings of K-pop...

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Gangs of London

Director: Gareth Evans (plus action sequence director in certain episodes), Xavier Gens, Corin Hardy (various episodes)

Writers: Peter Berry, Claire Wilson, Carl Joos, Joe Murtaugh, Lauren Sequeira, Gareth Evans, Matt Flannery

Cast: Joe Cole, Sope Dirisu, Michelle Fairley, Lucian Msamati, Paapa Essiedu, Narges Rashidi, Orli Shuka, Asif Raza Mir, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Brian Vernel, Valene Kane, Colm Meaney, Mads Koudal

Producers: Hugh Warren, Ed Talfan

Music: Jeremy Stack

Cinematography: Matt Flannery, Laurent Barès, Martijn van Broekhuizen

Editors: Johnny Rayner, Sara Jones, Harrison Wall

Cert: 18

Running time: 9 hours (approx.)

Year: 2020



What’s the story: When London crime boss Finn Wallace (Meaney) is murdered, his volatile son S...

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Shudder Sunday

For those of us social distancing alone, technology is not only a conduit to reaching friends and family, it often becomes a friend or cool cousin. When lockdown rules are relaxed, it will be interesting for us lone stay-at-homers to mingle with real people again, rather than exclusively talking to faces on Zoom. I foresee awkwardness.

Technology, specifically a Roku box and my TV, enabled me to spend last Sunday with Shudder, immersing myself in independent horror cinema. By independent I don’t mean cheap, but rather imaginative, surprising and exhilarating film making.

No, Shudder are not paying me or offering a free subscription to write this. To prove it, on the Roku box cast and director details are not listed for any of the movies...

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Insidious: In praise of a perfect jump scare

Something wicked this way comes in Insidious…

WARNING: This feature discusses a key shock point in 2010’s Insidious. If you have not seen Insidious, we strongly urge you to do so before reading on. As of the publish date, in the UK the film and its sequels are available on Netflix. 


The jump scare. Cinema’s poor cousin to carefully crafted dread and suspense. Why go for atmosphere when a shrieky-faced banshee in a fright wig jumping out the shadows, while a migraine of violins crashes onto the soundtrack, will get you a decent scream?

Many films are guilty of walking this lazy path. Two that always stand out for us are 2012’s The Woman in Black and 2016’s The Conjuring 2. They should have known better…

Yet, when done well, the jump scare is a feat of filmmak...

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Moonraker – The Movie Robcast

For multiple obvious reasons, No Time to Die has been moved back to November. But we still wanted to give you a Bond episode for April.

There were twenty-four 007 missions from which to choose, including some of the most influential films ever made. So, why did we go for Moonraker, the Bond film typically dismissed as the Star Wars rip-off with a double-taking pigeon?

The short answer is because Rob W likes it. The longer answer is, because Rob W likes it and Rob D was scared Rob W would go full-on Jaws if he didn’t get his way. That’s also the false answer.

The real reason is because Moonraker is a fascinating Bond film...

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Home Premiere Round-Up – The Movie Robcast

Episode 88 sees the two Robs taking a deep dive into four films fast-tracked to home rental when Coronavirus closed cinemas.  Bloodshot, Military Wives, Emma and The Hunt. With such a mixed bag, it should be no surprise to read it’s a case of good and bad (not much ugly though). 

There is only one real stinker in the bunch, another that never quite finds the correct tone, one is an absolute blast, and another is a Top 10 of the Year contender.  But, which is which? You’ll have to listen to find out… although you may be able to guess which one will not be a candidate for best of the year lists.

The Robs are remote recording again, still sticking to the rules of social distancing. During the episode, Rob W is brought light refreshment from a family member...

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