Cinematic Greens tagged posts

Blu-ray Review: The Life of Oharu

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Director: Kenji Mizoguchi

Writer: Kenji Mizoguchi, Yoshikata Yoda (screenplay), Saikaku Ihara (novel)

Cast: Kinuyo Tanaka, Toshiro Mifune

Cert: PG

Running time: 137 mins

Year: 1952


Accolades:
1952 Venice Film Festival
International Award

Electric Shadows rating: medium_5
Criterion Extras: medium_3


What’s the story: In 17th century Japan, noblewoman Oharu is exiled from Kyoto for the crime of loving someone belonging to a lower caste, beginning a lifelong struggle against misfortune.

What’s the verdict: Winner of the International Award at 1952’s Venice Film Festival, The Life of Oharu proved Japanese cinema did not start and stop with Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, grand prize winner at Venice a year before.

Where Rashomon was kinetic and visceral, The Life of Oharu was c...

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Blu-Ray Review: Multiple Maniacs

Welcome to Cinematic Greens

#6 – Multiple Maniacs (1970)

Director: John Waters

Writer: John Waters

Cast: Divine, Mink Stole, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Cookie Mueller

Cert: 18

Running time: 96 minutes

Year: 1970


Contemporary review:
“Even the garbage is too good a place for it.”
Mary Avara, Maryland Board of Censors

“(Print) Destroyed” – Canadian Censor report

Film: 

Extras: 


What’s the story: A couple who front a bizarre traveling circus become murderous when their relationship collapses.

What’s the verdict: “A CELLULOID ATROCITY!” pants the original, hand drawn promotional material for John Waters’ sophomore feature. And it ain’t lying.

47 years may have tempered Multiple Maniacs’ shock value, but trace echoes remain of just how bizarre and vile it must have...

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The Most Dangerous Game (1932)

The Most Dangerous Game - poster, Fay WrayWelcome to Cinematic Greens

#4 – The Most Dangerous Game (1932)

Director: Irving Pichel, Ernest B. Schoedsack

Writers: James Ashmore Creelman, Richard Connell (short story)

Cast: Joel McCrea, Leslie Banks, Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, Noble Johnson

Cert: 12

Running time: 63mins

Year: 1932

Contemporary review:
“Banks grabs everything worth grabbing among performance honors. Fay Wray has no opportunity to be anything but decorative. With McCrea and Robert Armstrong (as a booze-guzzling simpleton) miscasting is evident.” – Variety, Dec 31st 1931

Electric Shadows rating:

The lowdown: Roaring RKO ripping yarn based on perhaps cinema’s most oft-filmed story...

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