Golden Globe winning tagged posts

1917 & The Gentlemen – The Movie Robcast

You may have noticed The Movie Robcast has a lovely new logo image. Created by the rather wonderful Bridge Fazio, we’re thrilled with it. See more of Bridge’s work here: www.bridgefazio.com

Episode 79 sees Robs Daniel & Wallis review both the ridiculous and the, not sublime, but well-crafted.

The ridiculous is Guy Ritchie’s dated, mean-spirited gangster fluff The Gentlemen, starring Matthew McConaughey, Hugh Grant, Charlie Hunnam, Henry Golding and Michelle Dockery, all of whom should know better. Wanna see a film where cash-poor, land-rich aristos are the real victims? No, us neither, but we did so we could warn you off it.

Much better is Sam Mendes’ 1917, his World War I epic made to resemble one continuous real-time shot...

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Three Billboards… & Darkest Hour – The Electric Shadows Podcast

In Episode 37 of The Electric Shadows Podcast, Robs Daniel & Wallis look at one of the best films of the year and a contender for one of the worst.

Impressing them is Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. A dramatic, witty and compassionate tale of a mother’s anger at the local police for not finding her daughter’s killer, it is a powerhouse of adult storytelling, populated with some of the best characters yet from the man behind In Bruges.

At the other end of the spectrum is Darkest Hour. Joe Wright’s film presents Winston Churchill as the eccentric man of the people popular history likes to portray him as. It all amounts to little more than Sunday afternoon TV fluff, until Wright and co present a scene so misjudged and tin-eared it ruins their movie...

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Darkest Hour (2017)

Director: Joe Wright

Writer: Anthony McCarten

Cast: Gary Oldman, Kristin Scott-Thomas, Stephen Dillane, Lily James, Ben Mendelsohn, Ronald Pickup

Cert: PG

Running time: 125mins

Year: 2017


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What’s the story: As Britain stands alone against the Nazis, and its army awaits capture at Dunkirk, newly appointed prime minister Winston Churchill clashes with critics in his own party about fighting Germany or negotiating for peace.

What’s the verdict: Unlike those brothers who shared his family name, Joe Wright has yet to successfully land a project. Sometimes his films soar briefly. But, audience expectations crash to earth with a sense of frustrated disappointment (Atonement) or outright annoyance (The Soloist).

Darkest Hour promises to be the director’s most sustained movie yet...

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