short film tagged posts

Corvidae

Director: Tom de Ville

Writer: Tom de Ville

Cast: Maisie Williams, Jamie Davis, Archie Duffy, Joe Wolstenholme, Edward Wallace

Cert: 12

Running time: 11mins

Year: 2018



What’s the story: Young ornithophile Jay (Williams) attempts to nurse a crow, injured by local boys. Those boys then set their sights on Jay.

What’s the verdict: No matter how long it takes, some directors must get their story told. Writer/director Tom de Ville fits nicely into that bracket; his memorable, unusual Corvidae spent six years reaching the screen.

The bulk of principal shooting occurred back in December 2012, with editing, scoring, reshoots and FX work filling out the rest of the time (with crowdfunding assistance, presumably for the visual effects shots).

Happily, the result was worth both time and effor...

Read More

Cop This! Mike Mort Talks Chuck Steel: Night of the Trampires

Mike Mort’s infectiously fun mash-up of 80s action clichés and horror tropes has been a pet-project years in the making. Chuck Steel himself (imagine Dirty Harry without the sensitivity training) has been percolating with the writer/director since his teens.

The 14-minute short Chuck Steel: Raging Balls of Steel Justice played the festival circuit in 2013 and set the template for Steel’s feature debut. Lovingly detailed Claymation style stop-motion animation, violent splatter, unabashedly un-PC jokes broad enough that no-one should take to Twitter…!

We sat down with Mort to discuss the making of his glorious mash-up of Wallace and Gromit and Stallone’s Cobra. 


Rob Daniel: I had a blast with Chuck Steel: Night of the Trampires...

Read More

Safiyah Flies Across The Ocean

Safiyah-Flies-Across-The-Ocean---posterDirector: Samuel de Ceccatty

Writer: Mei Leng Yew

Cast: Olivia Anson, Rebecca Herod, Lewis Fernee

Cert: TBC

Running time: 13mins

Year: 2015




The lowdown: Friendship, growing pains and Middle Eastern revolution come together in this moving short film. Safiyah, a young British Egyptian girl bored in a London tenement flat attempts to get a letter to her dad, in Egypt during the Arab Spring. Local lad Thomas may have the answer with his toy helicopter. Perfectly judged magic realism twins with darker incidents happening far away in a short film that promises big things to come from its creators.

Safiyah-Flies-Across-The-Ocean---Olivia-Anson,-Rebecca-HerodSafiyah-Flies-Across-The-Ocean---Olivia-Anson,-Lewis-Fernee

The full verdict: The opening shot of a toy truck twinned the sound of a real engine gunning sets the tone. Safiyah’s world is where fantasy and harsh reality intertwine.

Yew’s debut script i...

Read More

Mei Leng Yew talks Safiyah Flies Across The Ocean

Mei-Leng-Yew-interview---Safiyah-Flies-Across-The-OceanAs movie lengths grow ever longer and more arduous, the short film continues to prove good things often come in small packages.

One such good thing is Safiyah Flies Across The Ocean, a touching story set in 2011 about a young British-Egyptian girl waiting to hear news from her father who is caught up far away in the Arab Spring. Deciding that her mum is standing in the way of her reuniting with her dad, Safiyah decides to embark upon a journey to find him.

A children’s adventure story and quietly powerful political drama, in 13 brief minutes it packs in more character, emotion, magic and wonder than most blockbusters do in ten times that duration.

Earlier this year we caught up with the film’s writer Mei Leng Yew to discuss what drew her to the subject and how this gem came to be.

Ele...

Read More

Kim Jee-woon Interview at the London Korean Film Festival

Kim Jee-woonKorean director Kim Jee-woon may not be a household name in this country, but chances are you may have come across his excellent tale of the supernatural A Tale of Two Sisters and you’ll definitely have heard of his Arnold Schwarzenegger action movie The Last Stand.

A suspense filmmaker in the same league as David Fincher or Brian De Palma, Kim Jee-woon’s movies peer into the darker corners of the human mind to stunning effect.

Kim Jee-woon - I Saw The Devil posterHis 2010 film I Saw the Devil is a serial killer classic in waiting, while The Good, The Bad, The Weird is an action movie with brains as well as brawn.

Kim is also a director who flits between feature films and short movies, and on 9th November presented four of his shorts to great acclaim at the London Korean Film Festival.

We caught up with him to discuss sho...

Read More